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PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 2:46 pm 
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Over the past some while I have refined my understanding of the plans for the "trailing" key switch sent in connection with a key switch bearing articulation mark and (if "Latch" is checked) sent in connection with a key switch bearing expression.

Certain behaviors that had earlier seemed to me to be anomalous in fact were not, but were artifacts of the proper working of the "plans" when I had been careless about the overall testing scenario.

The one behavior that still seems to me to be anomalous is the "last resort" trailing key switch sent on behalf of a keyswitch bearing articulation mark. It is the one sent if we have none of the higher-precedence influences: (a) an explicit "At note end" key switch set in the Edit Expression dialog, (b) the key switch for the articulation state prior to this event (based on the last prior key switch), (c) the key switch defined by the applicable keySwitchOff attribute in the sound map file, or (d) the key switch defined for the first-listed attribute in the applicable attribute/key switch list in the sound map file.

When none of those exist, Overture sends as the trailing key switch a key switch one semitone higher than the "leading" key switch set/seen as "At note start" for the articulation mark. It is hard for me to believe that this is the intent here.

In a somewhat comparable situation with respect to a keyswitch bearing expression, the "last result" trailing key switch is at pitch Cx, where x is the octave of the "leading" key switch for the expression. Perhaps the same was intended for the articulation mark situation.

Cheers,

Alan


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 3:03 pm 
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So you are saying that expressions and articulations do not have the same default or automatic at note end keyswitch ? (by automatic I mean that the user has not entered anything in the "at note end" box.)
I have not seen a consistent, logical result with these things and, as I noted in another post, octaves for ASO keyswitces don't always match the default selection in OV. Do you agree?


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 3:43 pm 
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Greetings, Pete,
PeteFine wrote:
So you are saying that expressions and articulations do not have the same default or automatic at note end keyswitch ? (by automatic I mean that the user has not entered anything in the "at note end" box.)

Yes, and when none of the other considerations in the pecking order are not present either (see below), the "last resort" for the trailing key switch is used, and that not consistent between expressions and articulation marks (the one for articulation marks is probably just screwed up).

Quote:
I have not seen a consistent, logical result with these things and, as I noted in another post, octaves for ASO switches don't always match the default selection in OV. Do you agree?

There are no "default" assignments of key switches to articulation marks or expressions. Such assignments always come from the sound map file (if any) in effect. If no sound map is in effect, or a sound map that does not assign key switches to articulations, then in Overture no expressions or articulation marks will, as we find them, have key switches assigned.

The key switches defined by the ASO sound map file for various ASO articulations typically differ from the keyswitches defined for various articulations (and in fact, the list of available articulations will vary) with other sound map files in place.

Or are you speaking of the fact that different octave conventions are used in different places to describe key switch pitches? That has nothing to do with the actual pitches of the key switches - just how we see/set/write them. The synthesizer does not receive a key switch as pitch "C1" (sometimes seen/set/written as "C0"). It receives it as pitch 24.

Just for clarity, in connection with an articulation mark (for which a "trailing" key switch is always sent), and in connection with an expression (for which a "trailing" key switch is sent if "latch" is checked, there is a "pecking order" of considerations that dictate what that trailing key switch is.

That pecking order is:

1. (Applies to articulation marks only) The "At note end" key switch, if one is set.

2. The same the last prior key switch, if there was one (the "as you were" choice)

3. The key switch defined by the applicable keySwitchOff attribute in the sound map file, if there is one

4. The key switch defined for the first attribute in the applicable articulation/sound map list in the sound map file, if there is such a list

5. (For expressions) The keyswitch Cx, where x is the octave of the "initial" key switch that is set.
{For articulation marks) A keyswitch one semitone above the "initial" keyswitch

Cheers,

Alan


Last edited by TenorAlan on Tue Jan 14, 2020 4:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 4:12 pm 
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Greetings, Pete,

Further to the matter of octave notation.

ASO, with regard to instruments that use the "Solo Strings" articulation list, will put into effect the "staccato" articulation when it receives a Note ON message with pitch 24. (We almost never see this said, but this is the fact.)

Now Overture learns of this from the ASO sound map file, which states that pitch as "C#0"; this is under the "middle C=C3" octave convention, which is in fact declared at the head of the ASO sound map file. And under than convention, that means pitch 24.

This keyswitch pitch is described in the ASO manual as "C#0". How do we know what octave convention is used there? It is not stated. We have to know that this is what is most often done in "VST instrument" documentation.

Now in Overture, if we look at the key switch assigned to the staccato articulation mark we will see that it it C#0, or C#1, or C#2, depending of the convention we have set to be used in the Overture user interface (middle C= C3, C4, or C5). I don't know which of these is in place for a virgin installation of Overture (some might describe that as the "Overture default"), but that doesn't matter.

But none of that has any effect on how ASO works: it will put into effect the staccato articulation for the Solo Strings instrument group if it sees a "key switch" with pitch 24.

And if we don't change anything. Overture, for a staccato articulation mark, will send a key switch of pitch 24. It may explain that to us as "C#0", or "C#1", or "C#2", depending on what convention we have selected for the user interface, but in all cases that key switch has pitch 24.

Now, the use of different octave conventions for seeing. or setting, or writing pitches is unfortunate, and it can confuse us as we work with these things, but it does not lead to any technical incompatibility or uncertainty.

Cheers,

Alan


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